3 more South Australian poets, part 1/3

My first blog post, two years ago, commented on the long-standing perception that Australian poets living in the cultural hinterlands struggle to find the same recognition as those living in the rival metropolises of Sydney and Melbourne. In response, I offered a list of 10 contemporary poets who provide a sensible starting point for anyone wanting to read more South Australian poetry. The launch of Puncher & Wattmann’s excellent Contemporary Australian Poetry anthology in Adelaide, and the celebration of the South Australian poets who feature therein, has prompted this three-part supplement to the original list.

Each part will include details for three South Australian poets who (I think) should be known, or better known, across the borders. For each poet, I’ll list a couple of recent publications, including chapbooks by local publishers Garron Publishing and Little Windows Press. I’ll also include links to poems that can be read online, or references to poems in anthologies that are readily available.

Part 2 and Part 3 will follow in coming days.

Click here for details about ordering chapbooks from Garron Publishing.

Click here for details about ordering chapbooks from Little Windows Press.

Steve Brock, poet and translator

‘A born-in-the-70s late comer to the Australian poetic scene, Steve Brock has come striding into his own with this low-key, lower-case and low-life poetry in a voice distinctly Stephenesque.’ – Ouyang Yu on Double Glaze

  • Double Glaze (Five Islands Press, 2013) review
  • Trilingual Mapuche Poetry Anthology (co-translator with Sergio Holas & Juan Garrido-Salgado) (Interactive Press, 2014) extracts
  • Jardin du Luxembourg and Other Poems (chapbook) (Garron Publishing, 2016) review
  • Poem: ‘Vanishing Point’ (Transnational Literature)
  • Poem: ‘Café Paradiso’ (Cordite Poetry Review)
  • Poem: ‘The Day I Dropped Creeley’ (The Best Australian Poems 2014)

Jelena Dinic, bilingual poet

‘Having migrated to Australia from Serbia in her teens, Dinic writes in both English and Serbian, but remains profoundly influenced by the minimalism of the postwar East European poets, none more so than the work of her great countryman, Vasko Popa.’ – Peter Goldsworthy on the South Australian States of Poetry anthology

Alison Flett, poet and publisher

‘Flett’s tightly structured, experimental text is impressive beyond her facility for stylistic variety. Woven through her tropes of encounter is the question: how can humans remember they are animals? And subsequently: can language be made to speak this fact? Can language be wild?’ – Lucy Van on Semiosphere

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